Family Life: Children’s books for Spring’s Arrival

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My favorite children's book for spring. Find them all on the Fresh Exchange

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They say one of the greatest things we can do for our children is to read to them. When I first heard that I thought it was simply because of language development and it is, but as a mother who sits each night reading books to my child each night, I realize it is more than that. Reading creates a connection that is far deeper. From the sitting on your lap to the connection of creating a conversation between each other. Not to mention how it vividly opens our minds many times as well and helps us enter their world and mind for only a few minutes. Books are an essential part of parenting both of child and parent. They tell stories that sometimes we cannot offer them. It helps us both have a way to handle changes in life and explain things we may not be able to. Books are powerful.

That said, since Hayes was born we have been reading. At first, it was only picture books and then the short board books with words. Now, we read stories about discovery, imaginary worlds, and hard lessons. I find myself growing by reading these to him. I have been challenged to see the rain in a new way, look for tracks in the snow, or even look closer when walking in the woods. In the last year or so I have been collecting a list of books that I feel help us and our children connect to their world in a more direct way. Living in a seasonal climate, I am always on the hunt for books that explain our changing landscape. So I gathered up some of our favorites and ones I am adding to our collection of books.

I find these small changes even in what I read to him makes a difference in how we both connect to our world on our daily walks and through life here in Northern Michigan. I also find focusing on adding seasonal books helps me stay focused on rotating the books on his shelves each season. This keeps him and I both interested. I usually keep a mix of 3-4 favorites from the past season, all from a current season, and 3-4 of an upcoming season. This way we can talk about past experiences we had, what we see happening right now, and what is ahead of us to look forward to. It keeps the seasonal conversation at the front of all our minds.

My favorite children's book for spring. Find them all on the Fresh Exchange

Nature’s Way by Kay Maguire
A Walk in the Forest by Maria Dek
Before / After by Mattheis Arégui.
The Little Gardener by Emily Hughes
Plant the Tiny Seed by Christie Matheson 
Rain! By Linda Ashman
Flowers are Calling by Rita Grey
Float by Daniel Miyares
Up In the Garden and Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner
Bee by Britta Teckentrap
Make it Grow by Debbie Powell

For spring I am always looking for books for us that are focused on the outdoors and talking about how our world is coming back to life. From explaining butterflies to growing a garden and how flowers are important for more than just their beauty. Explaining these small nuances in our world I feel it helps us become aware of them as they unfold around us. I also look for books that encourage finding beauty in the ugly moments of a season and especially the beauty of the rhythms of the season. I find many times he connects these small pieces from a book to our world and vice versa. It is simple, but I think creating an awareness early in life for the world around us is essential in finding happiness and excitement for the present moment of every season.

So what seasonal books do you love for spring?! Do you have a favorite you read a lot? Or as an adult is there a book you love for spring? Please share! We would love to hear.

Hello! I’m Megan Gilger,

A strong believer that nature and the seasons are our greatest teachers. We live on a hill in Leelanau County, Michigan just a stone’s throw from Lake Michigan. This land we are responsible for is where we are focused on building a life around the seasons and intention. We spend our days here building a regenerative model of living and focusing our garden on native plants and intensive polyculture planting styles. My focus is less on self-sufficiency and more on community-sufficiency through how we grow and connect through the seasons.
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